Although skiing and snowboarders have a lot in common, there are a few differences between the two sports, particularly when it comes to injuries. When skiing, the skier keeps his back to the ground and shifts from side to side. The torso and shoulders get wrenched forward, and the body is facing sideways. To snowboard down the mountain, the body requires a variety of muscles just from the fundamental stance. Add in speed, jumps, and other tricks, and you’ve got a workout that needs a lot of strength, endurance, and power from the core and legs.

  • INJURIES TO THE KNEE/ACL

Lower extremity injuries, such as knee injuries, have become less common among snowboarders as the design of snowboard boots and bindings has improved. A supportive knee brace, on the other hand, is a must-have gear if an ACL injury occurs. To avoid this, snowboarders should warm up their bodies with knee exercises before hitting the slopes to prepare for rapid reactions and off-balance motions. When snowboarding, as with any sport, it’s critical to warm up and cool down properly.

  • ON THE ANKLE SPRAINS

Ankle sprains can get caused by a variety of things. It might be anything from ill-fitting shoes and bindings to ligament overuse and a fall. Excessive pressure and inversion get given to the cluster of tiny bones in the foot and the ankle joint of a rough landing following a jump. Make sure the ankle does not move in the boot, which should fit snugly. Soft boots increase both maneuverability and injury risk. Racers typically wear boots because they provide better ankle support. Hybrid boots are gaining popularity due to their ability to reduce injury risks while still providing some flexibility. Billy Crafton from San Diego has all the options available to overcome these injuries.

  • DISLOCATIONS, FRACTURES, AND SEPARATIONS OF THE SHOULDERS

Shoulder dislocations, fractures, and separations are typically caused by landing incorrectly. Falling can help you avoid shoulder injuries like dislocation or fracture. Try practicing a sport-specific activity that mimics falling. Prepare your body and respond if you need to tumble. Damage can get avoided by using shoulder protection.

  • INJURIES TO THE SPINAL CORD

In snowboarding, spinal injuries have become more common in recent years. The most common cause of spinal injury among snowboarders is jumping, followed by a fall and then overuse. Before attempting the stunts on the slopes, experts recommend that individuals who jump acquire a good technique and practice leaps off the mountain.

  • INJURIES TO THE WRIST, HANDS, AND THUMB

A wrist fracture is a common snowboarding injury. When snowboarders fall on their outstretched hands, they break their wrists. The wrist bones are under too much strain, and they shatter as a result. The ligaments of the wrist can also get damaged in wrist sprains, according to Billy Crafton from San Diego. Wrist protectors can help you avoid fractures and sprains in your wrist. Sprains can also get eased by keeping their hands in a fist.